Iron Man


Iron Man (2008) is the first film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) — and extensive network of films introducing various Marvel superheroes and characters that leads to the exciting joining of forces with the Avengers. Robert Downey Jr. quintessentially stars as genius billionaire Tony Stark, who runs Stark Industries, primarily a weapons manufacturing business.

Starting the MCU with Iron Man was a great choice. Up to that point, most superheroes that have graced the silver screen were overly known, immensely popular names, like Superman and Batman — and on the Marvel side, Spiderman. Kicking off a giant movie franchise with a more unknown character made Marvel seem fresh and energetic, a quality that they have kept going with films like Guardians of the Galaxy and Ant-Man. With fun writing and impeccable casting, Marvel has introduced various characters into the pop cultural lexicon, like Tony Stark.

RDJ plays Stark with a finesse that has only improved over the years. He absolutely embodies Tony Stark, who is a careful balance of “endearing asshole”. RDJ delivers lines with command but also exudes an incredible amount of charm. That, mixed with Stark’s character change from profiteer to humanitarian, wins over the audience’s hearts. Iron Man‘s success and popularity would undoubtedly be less without Robert Downey Jr.

Director Jon Favreau also brought in fresh ideas for Iron Man. He modernized Iron Man’s origin story to resonate more with audiences. His collaboration with composer Ramin Djawadi brought a head-banging’ score filled with hip rock guitar. He set the film on the West Coast, reasoning that he was tired of superhero movies set mostly in New York. Favreau’s vision was singular in creating the right energy and momentum to start off the MCU. Iron Man even originated Agent Phil Coulson (Clark Gregg), whose part was initially much smaller but was further incorporated due to his great chemistry with the rest of the cast — a decision that would lead to the emotional crux to The Avengers and ABC’s spin-off series Agents of SHIELD.

Iron Man is a fresh and energetic superhero action film that introduced Tony Stark and Iron Man to the world. RDJ gives a flawless and youthful performance, perfectly donning the Stark persona. Iron Man is a wonderful start to the MCU that will grow into a vastly entertaining superhero franchise.

Ant-Man


Ant-Man (2015) is the final film of Phase Two in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It introduces Hank Pym (Michael Douglas), the original Ant-Man, and his passing the torch to Scott Lang (Paul Rudd).

What a fun movie! Paul Rudd is absolutely endearing and such a funny guy. His superhero persona channels Chris Pratt’s Star-Lord over the more serious Avengers superheroes in the MCU, but, jokes aside, he does have a serious motivation: his daughter. He’s a hero in her eyes, and he wants to prove to her and every one else that he isn’t a lost cause. Pym isn’t as messed up as he is in the comics, but there is a huge rift between him and his daughter Hope (Evangeline Lilly). She is a strong and focused woman, an expert in everything her father mastered — everything from fighting skills to communicating with ants. Lilly, as always, puts on a superb performance, transcending the script more than was perhaps imagined. Similarly, Judy Greer’s few scenes as Lang’s ex-wife are scene-stealers. Every thing she does looks perfectly natural and effortless. (Someone write a leading role for Judy Greer, please.)

I still have trouble grasping the idea of Ant-Man. It’s hard for me to accept a shrunken superhero who fights with normal-sized superheroes. I concede that I have seen giants fighting with normal-sized superheroes, like Juggernaut in X-Men and I suppose the Hulk, but going the other way is strange. Half the time I was laughing at how funny it is to watch tiny superheroes fighting, like on the train set. As fun as it is to watch, and as fun as it makes a movie night out, it’s hard for me to take seriously, which I get isn’t the point — but at some point Ant-Man (and Wasp!) will join up with the Avengers and I can’t even imagine how that will work out. But that’s my own issue. I look forward to Phase Three of the MCU, which starts with Captain America: Civil War where Ant-Man will make his next appearance. It’s also weird watching ants doing strategic missions. It’s both absurd and frightening — I might have ant army nightmares.

Ant-Man is a lot of fun, what with Rudd’s funny and sometimes awkward jokes and Michael Peña’s excellent storytelling; however, it is a pretty generic superhero film: origin, training, execution. Luckily, there are all the fun elements to make it not so pedantic, largely coming from the solid cast. When Iron Man came out, his was a character that was not very familiar outside of the comic books world, but now he is a household name. I like that Marvel is including less known characters, like Ant-Man and The Guardians of the Galaxy. Enjoy a summer night with Ant-Man, and make sure that you stay until the very end of the end credits hint hint nudge nudge.