Noah


Noah (2014) is a biblically inspired epic fantasy film (emphasis on the fantasy) written and directed by Darren Aronofsky, score by Clint Mansell. Although inspired by the biblical story of Noah, it is a fantasy film separate from that cannon, ultimately attempting to develop the character of Noah — who is quite well known from the Bible while being insufficiently written about or described.

I can still remember seeing rumors about Aronofsky’s next film on Twitter, cocking my head to the side as it was revealed to be a film about Noah. It didn’t seem particularly characteristic for Aronofsky, but after I got over my perplexed shock, I put my trust in him. I’ve enjoyed his films, and I believed that he would be able to pull it off. Over the months, after hearing casting decisions and production news, my curiosity and excitement rose. I really had no idea what to expect. There have been a plethora of articles and reviews about the film, which piqued my interest and curiosity even more. Now it is time for me to pass my judgment on the film. And it is good. For the most part.

The first thing to understand about this film is that it’s inspired by the biblical story — it does not set out to be a literal representation of the tale in the Bible. Aronofsky was fascinated by Noah since he was a kid. Because Noah as a person was not widely discussed in the Bible, he set out to create this film to address the man, the character of Noah. Something that both Aronofsky and Russell Crowe had to tackle was discovering Noah’s character. In the Bible, God chooses Noah and his family to repopulate the Earth, so it is widely believed that Noah was a kind and benevolent man. Aronofsky’s take on Noah is a man who has the strength and will to complete God’s task — to let countless men, women, and children die. This version of Noah is hard, unwavering, yet just. Though, the fundamental difference between the Bible’s Noah and Aronofsky’s Noah is that The Creator (he’s never addressed as God in the film) does not explicitly communicate with or give instructions to Noah. In the Bible, God gives Noah very specific instructions, but in the film, Noah has to deduce what The Creator wants from him. This leads to what I felt to be the awkward part of the film, where Noah sincerely believes that The Creator does not want him or his family to repopulate the Earth after the floods are cleared away. Because of this, he doesn’t obtain wives for Ham or Japheth, and he sets out to kill his previously-barren-turned-furtile adopted daughter’s newborns — all to appease The Creator’s wishes. However awkward it feels to watch it, the narrative gives Noah some depth as a character, a pious man who has to realize and accept that there is good in humanity despite the debauchery and sin he witnessed from the descendants of Cain.

I do have some problems with Noah’s character, though. My biggest problem is his decision to abandon the girl that Ham (Logan Lerman) tries to save. When the family first set out, they found Ila injured. A mob of evil men descended on them; they could have left Ila there, but they took the girl with them and raised her as part of the family. It’s a bit hypocritical to leave the girl, Na’el (Madison Davenport), to die, but Noah at that point believes there is no goodness in anybody, including himself. He believes that he and his family are only supposed to safely care for the animals until they can repopulate a human-less Earth, which leads to a big theme in Noah: environmentalism.

The film cries out in support and defense of the natural world. As the family journeys to see Noah’s grandfather, Methuselah (Anthony Hopkins), they’re pursued by a gang of evil men. They’re forced to run out into a barren land, black and dry of any nutrients. It shows how greedy and apathetic mankind has become towards nature — a clear metaphor for our present society and its unconcern for the natural world. The Earth becomes an actual character in the film, beautifully showcased in many gorgeous shots, particularly in the incredible evolutionary creationism sequence that accompanies the creation story Noah tells the family. The Creator establishes a beautiful world filled with many wonders, and humankind has raped and desecrated it. Nature is also the only way that The Creator communicates with Noah. He sends down a water drop to bloom into a flower in mere seconds to get Noah’s attention. He creates a forest from a sprouting fountain that will provide the lumber for the ark. He destroys the world with floods and water. The natural world is the vessel through which The Creator speaks, which may be suggesting that to embrace and care for the natural world is to embrace godliness.

Aronofsky creates some incredible shots and sequences in the film. His characteristic quick edits make an appearance in Noah in a couple artistic and effective scenes. First is the shot of the doves that follow the stream to the ark. What follows is a series of shots in rapid succession. It would not have been as effective if one or two shots of the doves flying were smoothly edited together to show the passing of time. The quick shots position the birds flying among a plethora of backgrounds, showing a passage of time and change of scenery. Edited quickly, and fitting in a myriad of shots in a short amount of time, it gives the illusion that an extreme amount of time is passing. Another scene that moved me was when Methuselah cures Ila (Emma Watson) of her barrenness. He’s digging for berries and she happens upon him as she searches for Ham. Never having met before, he wants to give his blessing since she is part of the family. He touches her, and an invisible wave of energy emits from her body. She looks up at the trees, at first unclear, and slowly begins to see them in focus. This scene supports the miraculous power of fertility, again relating to the wonders of the natural world. Struck barren for most of her life, once Ila has been given the gift to bear children again, nature reacts physically to emphasize the power there is in womanhood. My favorite scene is the evolutionary creationism sequence. Noah, to accentuate the purpose for cleansing the world of humankind, tells his family the story of creation. It follows the timeline dictated in Genesis, but the sequence that accompanies the story does not follow the literal timeline. The visuals begin with the big bang, and shows the creation of the Earth and the moon out of chaos, the formation of land and sea over eons, and the beginnings of life from amoeba to evolved life forms, all in a beautiful and impressive sequence.

Jennifer Connelly plays Noah’s wife, subtly and beautifully. She’s a strong companion to him and a nurturing mother to their children. Despite that, she’s written into an Eve-like character that I don’t particularly like. She’s the one that speaks with Methuselah about curing Ila’s barrenness, but that is after he’s convinced that humankind should not continue in the new Earth. Because of his unwavering position, she’s painted as the weak woman who was driven by emotion to undermine his decisions. Her alluring and graceful character from the beginning of the film transforms into a flat and mundane character towards the end of the film, which is a shame.

Noah is a film designed to explore the motivations of and character behind Noah. If you go into the theatre expecting to see an exact retelling from the Bible, you will be disappointed. The first two thirds of the film, leading to the building of the ark and the advent of the flood waters, are engaging and thrilling. The timing feels comfortably paced and the visuals on the screen are nothing short of epic. Once in the ark, the narrative goes to a strange, uncomfortable place. The film begins to feel long and is saturated with subplots, including the unnecessary stow-away subplot with Tubal-cain (Ray Winstone). The high energy of the film fizzles out once on the ark and is replaced with awkwardness. However, the incredible visuals, amazing cinematography and masterful editing make the film artistic and spectacular, which is definitely worth a watch.

Man of Steel


Man of Steel (2013) is the latest reboot of the Superman franchise, directed by Zack Snyder. The Superman film prior to Man of Steel was Superman Returns (2006) directed by Bryan Singer.

The film takes a different approach to a familiar and often-told story. The origin story of Planet Krypton is told in greater detail, illustrating an Avatar-like world that combines advanced technology and weaponry with savage structures and flying beasts. In the final moments before the planet explodes, Jor-El (Russell Crowe) sends his babe son into space, heading for Earth in order to preserve the race, against General Zod’s (Michael Shannon) wishes, who aims to preserve the race himself.

The film, after that point, takes a thoughtful approach to Superman’s upbringing. The next hour of the film has no linear plot. The film progresses through various flashbacks to Clark Kent’s (Henry Cavill) childhood, which allow the viewer to understand Clark’s present-day morality. They present the trials and tribulations that a young Clark faced, which molded his nomadic adulthood. Cavill’s portrayal of Superman is sensitive, expressing subtle changes in his voice and eyes. He fully utilizes his rugged features to exhibit Clark Kent’s wholesome, small-town America vibe.

The flashbacks continue as Lois Lane (Amy Adams) begins chasing down leads to write a story about Clark Kent. She delivers a strong portrayal of Lois Lane without risking vulnerability and compassion. Adams creates a driven female journalist with a hint of her signature sweetness.

Man of Steel expresses some religious imagery throughout the film, almost as if Superman is the ‘Man of God’. The way Superman is shown floating in the air is almost Christ-like, which comes as no surprise since his father describes him as a savior of mankind. These depictions are stunning yet curious — is he one of the human race or is he akin to a god? On a similar note, the scenes that showed Superman overcoming a considerable challenge were inspiring. The look on his face, the determination, the struggle, it all drew in focus and inspired. Superman becomes a stirring figure, comparable to a deity.

The film thrives on a thoughtful pace of meaningful memories, mirrored by calm and reflective music by Hans Zimmer, but the film unfortunately takes a turn from that introspective tone. In fact, the film makes such a stark change that it feels like Michael Bay came in and directed the second half of the film. As a concrete plot line is established, the tone and the story feel aggressive and somewhat false. This film tried to capitalize from previous superhero movies, particularly Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy, that presented superheroes and villains in an authentic way. That worked incredibly well for Nolan’s Batman films, because his villains were human, albeit crazed and extremely flawed. They worked in a real-world scenario because real life has shown eccentric and despicable beings. It did not work in this film for two reasons: 1) Superman’s world involves aliens and 2) the movie becomes action-centric. Aliens are always challenging to make realistic, and the entire encounter and communication with the human race is not believable.

The movie tries to be exciting and action-packed, like J.J. Abrams’ 2009 Star Trek is, but it overshoots the mark. The amount of destruction is laughable. There is a point in all the action when the viewer shuts down and waits for it all to stop. And when that stop finally arrives, the action just picks right back up and bombards the viewer with more. The writing, the one-liners, and the story all took a blow in the second half — where it feels like an entirely different film.

The reboot has tremendous potential, and if the movie gets a sequel, one can only hope that Snyder focuses on the thoughtful and unique storytelling from the first half. That is where the film shined.